Composting Toilet Journey & Rewards

Only in Westernized countries like America is composting our own humanure a foreign idea. There is a country in the Middle East, an ancient culture famous for their longevity and sustainable lifestyle (do a search on the Hunza People), they also compost their own “humanure” and use it to keep their soil fertile for growing crops. They are one of many cultures around the world who have practiced this since ancient times. Americans have a very unhealthy aversion to properly dealing with our own humanure, at the cost of many other living systems, and the way we “waste” it causes great harm to the Earth and many other species around us. Most people don’t care and don’t want to know what happens to their “waste” and want to flush it away, poisoning the ground, the water, the air and prompting sewage facilities to use a great amount of chemicals to treat the waste causing even more harm to the environment. Since learning of and studying Dr. Emoto’s work on the intelligence of water, and how our thoughts affect it, I felt like peeing and crapping in our water was sOoOoOo wrong! I wanted a change in this part of my life.

I read a book called, “The Humanure Handbook” by Joseph Jenkins. (http://humanurehandbook.com/) Where he wrote about his own experience/experiments composting his own family’s humanure over a several decade time period. It was a fascinating informative book that opened my eyes and inspired me to do my best to make the most of all of our resources, instead of treating our humanure as a waste, I wanted to use it as a resource as the Hunzan people do, and as Joseph Jenkins did. Tim and I were already not wanting to put in a toxic septic system, or lagoon, as these are notorious for stinking and poisoning the area around them, not to mention the really high cost of these systems financially. This was the answer we were seeking. After we purchased our land, we got in touch with the local health department to get permission to use a composting system. They said as long as we had a commercially made unit, that they would be fine with it. At first this pissed me off, as I wanted to go the cheaper route and build a composting unit and design toilets with a bucket system to deal with our humanure. Tim was smarter, and didn’t want to deal with buckets of crap, and wanted to make this area of our lives as easy as possible, and persisted in looking for an affordable composting toilet unit. So for months Tim was looking for a system on craigslist, not finding anything. Then he decided to post an ad, saying we are looking for one and the price range we had in mind. We were hoping to find a used one (cleaned out of course) for around $500. We got a response that I am so thankful for now, for a top of the line system made to accommodate 6-10 adults full time, including several bags of wood chips composting material and the starter cultures for $950! We jumped on that deal and brought this system all the way from Oregon with us. Tim wrapped the unit in shrink wrap and it rode in the van with us the 2000+ mile trip to Missouri. lol! It wouldn’t fit through the door of the trailer, so it had to ride in the van. It ended up being very helpful to have it in there even though it took up a lot of space. lol!

The Beginning of our Composting Toilet Journey Here you see the first posts Tim put in to create the platform for our composting toilet bathroom. In the distance behind the posts, the big white box thingy is a SunMar 3000 Composting Toilet Unit. We got a great deal on it in Oregon, and brought it all the way out here with us.

The Beginning of our Composting Toilet Journey
Here you see the first posts Tim put in to create the platform for our composting toilet bathroom. In the distance behind the posts, the big white box thingy is a SunMar 3000 Composting Toilet Unit. We got a great deal on it in Oregon, and brought it all the way out here with us. Pic taken 2013-04-30

Installed under the platform (2013-05-02) Super basic, but it worked... now for privacy :)

Installed under the platform (2013-05-02)
Super basic, but it worked… now for privacy 🙂

Composting Toilet Beginning 2013-05-02

Continuing to build up the walls and get rid of the tarp privacy curtain. We also built a wall around the end section of the platform and plan to use that as a storage area. Its so nice to have it all roofed, and walled in with our beautiful cordwood walls! ❤ Great Job Timmy!

Here is the rewards part, super rich, nutrient dense compost! It smells like dirt, no stinky at all! Funny how the composter dumps out the finished product in little balls, reminds me of horse poo! hahahaha! So we broke it all up, put it in a bin mixed with fresh sawdust and are gonna save it for Spring and fertilize our orchard trees with it then. It is amazing to me that 6 months of crapping in this thing and we get one full bin of compost material…. wow! I love our Composting Toilet! Now to keep it warm this winter…..

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4 thoughts on “Composting Toilet Journey & Rewards

  1. This was very helpful. I’ve been thinking about getting a composting toilet for our travel trailer. Didn’t know that human waste makes good fertilizer. What about unhealthy people or those who take prescription drugs? I’ll have to read up on that. Thanks Jaimie!

    • My Pleasure! We love our composting toilet, the hummus it makes is incredible fertilizer! From what I remember the microbes that compost the manure get the pile so hot that it will kill any pathogens and break down chemicals such as prescription drugs. I recommend reading “The Humanure Handbook” by Joseph Jenkins.

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